How COVID-19 is Impacting Prospective International Students at Different Study Levels
Wondering how the coronavirus has impacted prospective undergraduate, postgraduate by coursework, and postgraduate by research students? Click here for more details.
OECD Economic Survey SA 2020
This Overview is extracted from the 2020 Economic Survey of South Africa. The Survey is published on the responsibility of the Economic and Development Review Committee of the OECD, which is charged with the examination of the economic situation of member countries. The COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing lockdown have triggered a sharp drop in activity. South Africa reacted quickly to the outbreak by establishing a nationwide lockdown from March 26. Economic activity was reduced in mining and industry, and stopped in the tourism, entertainment and passenger transport sectors. Starting June 1st, the lockdown was eased to allow more economic activity and movement of people to work. Nonetheless, the spread of the virus continued and the number of cases increased rapidly in June and July. Click here for more details.
Prof Eric Atmore reflect on Epic Africa Survey 30 July 2020
Prof. Eric Atmore , University of Stellenbosch department of Education Policy Studies, and Director at the Centre for Early Childhood Development, extracted some recent data in terms of the impact of Covid-19 and thought that it would interest you. A good comparison for our organisations. As we pass 100 days of COVID-19 it is appropriate to look at the effect of the virus on civil society organisations in Africa. Epicafrica and @AfricanNGOs recently released a report https://bit.ly/3eMw9Gl on this topic, and it makes for interesting reading. • 1,015 African civil society organisations from 44 African countries were surveyed. This is what was found: • 98% reported that COVID-19 impacted and disrupted their operations in one or more ways. • 55.7% had already experienced a loss of funding, while 66.5% expected to lose funding in the next 3-6 months. • 84.5% indicated that they were not prepared to cope with the disruption caused by COVID-19 to their operations. • 49.9% had already introduced measures to reduce costs because of the loss of funding, or the uncertainty about future funding. • 78% believed that COVID-19 would have a devastating impact on the sustainability of many CSOs. • 69.3% had to reduce or cancel their operations, while 55% expect this to continue over the next 3-6 months. • 74% indicated that COVID-19 resulted in restricted movement of staff, while 79.4% experienced reduced face-to-face community interactions. • 84.5% implemented work-from-home arrangements. Although 75.4% had no such arrangements in place before COVID-19, 71.4% indicated that they would consider making it part of how their organizations operate post COVID-19. • 60.1% believed that COVID-19 would result in greater public appreciation for the work of CSOs, while 71.6% stated that governments failed to recognize and utilize local CSO skills, experience and networks in response to COVID-19. • 45.1% believed that CSOs would emerge stronger and more agile after the pandemic. • 84.8% introduced new programme activities in response to COVID-19, with 71.9% self-funding these activities. 77.2% indicated that local CSOs were playing a critical role in national responses to COVID-19. 85.5% stated that they could have done more if capacity or funding constraints were not a barrier. The full report can be found at https://bit.ly/3eMw9Gl Thank you to David Barnard for having sent this to me. What I suggest you do is to consider which of these statements apply to your NPO or to yourself as Director and then to take action in anticipation of the years ahead. Please stay healthy and safe at this time. ERIC ATMORE Director
How universities are addressing the coronavirus crisis and moving forward
Wondering how universities are responding to the coronavirus crisis and adapting their recruitment tactics and operational processes? Recent findings (data pulled 14 July) from the QS coronavirus survey of higher education institutions has revealed how universities are addressing the complex challenges posed by the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. This latest QS report will cover:
  • How universities are responding to the coronavirus crisis and what initiatives they’ve implemented to limit its impact
  • What ripple effects they’ve seen for their international student recruitment and why they think applications will decrease
  • How they’re adapting their student recruitment tactics
  • When they predict campuses will reopen and what this will look like Please fill out the short form to download your free copy of the report today.
Click here for more details.
Impact of COVID-19 on African CSOs
Civil society organisations undertake crucial developmental, humanitarian and advocacy functions across Africa, often under challenging conditions. Read about the impact of COVID-19 on African CSOs, based on a survey conducted by @AfricanNGOs and EPIC-Africa. Click here for more details.
What Is an "Essential" Purchase for a Low-Income Family?
Do lower-income families need and deserve access to fewer things than everyone else? As a society, we seem to think so, revealing a "grim double standard," finds a new study from Serena F. Hagerty, a PhD candidate at Harvard Business School and Kate Barasz, a Harvard Business School assistant professor. In 11 experiments, Hagerty and Barasz find that—relative to higher-income earners—people with lower incomes were judged more harshly for what they chose to buy, even when the two groups made identical consumer choices. It's a concept Hagerty and Barasz call "permissible consumption," or what is deemed socially acceptable (or not) for others to purchase. As they find, lower-income people are afforded a much narrower range of "permissibility." Click here for more details. 
Global Behaviors and Perceptions at the Onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic
An online survey of more than 110,000 people in 175 countries conducted at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic found that most respondents believe that their governments and fellow citizens are not doing enough, which heightens their worries and depression levels. Decisive actions and strong leadership from policymakers change how people perceive their governments and other citizens, and in turn improve their mental health. Click here for more details.
The Impact of COVID-19 on Higher Education around the World
The IAU Global Survey is part of a larger set of activities carried out by IAU to inform about the impact of COVID-19 on HE. Research IAU plans to carry out three global surveys on the impact of COVID 19 on universities and other higher education institutions. This first Report analyses the outcomes of the first survey. Next iterations are planned for fall 2020 and for 2021. Resources and information sharing IAU developed a series of Webpages1 to make useful information collected by IAU together with partner organisations around the world available to the global higher education community and other actors in society. As well, on an exceptional basis and to contribute to making higher education information available to the entire HE community in these particular times, IAU offers FREE access to the advanced search for the IAU World Higher Education Database and to the IAU HE Bibliographical Database (HEDBIB) until end of August 2020 Click here for more details.
Counting the Cost- COVID 19 : School closures in South Africa & its impact on children
The present paper sets out to offer evidence drawn from nationally representative household surveys, school surveys and administrative datasets, as well as research reports. The paper focuses on children, teachers and schooling with the following five focal areas: (1) school days lost to COVID-19, (2) comparing regular mortality risk by age to COVID-19 mortality risk by age, both for teachers and the public at large, (3) the feasibility of practicing social distancing within classrooms, (4) the social, economic and health costs associated with lockdown and school closures, (5) the challenges of re-opening the economy without re-opening schools, and especially the prevalence of young children being “home alone” without any adult care givers. We summarise the findings of each these areas below: Click here for more details.
Research and Development Goals for COVID-19 in Africa
On 11th March 2020, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the outbreak of a new type of Coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19 respiratory disease, a global pandemic. By the morning1 of 24th April 2020, 52 countries in Africa had officially reported cases with a total of >23,500 confirmed cases, >1,100 deaths, and >5800 full recoveries. The epicentre of the epidemic has shifted from Asia to Europe and has been accompanied by an increase in reported cases in Africa. African scientists need to be adequately prepared to inform interventions to prevent and mitigate the possible impacts of this pandemic on the continent. In Africa, the initiatives against this disease are spearheaded by the Africa CDC, African Union, and the WHO. The Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC) has established the Africa Task Force for Novel Coronavirus (AFCOR), to oversee preparedness and response to the global epidemic of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) disease. The African Academy of Sciences supports these organizations in delivering their mandate. Click here for more details.
The Impact of the Corona virus on Global Higher Education
COVID-19 has dramatically reshaped the way global higher education is delivered.   As a result, universities are rapidly shifting how they communicate and operate to meet the evolving needs of students and staff.   Click here for more details COVID-19 has dramatically reshaped the way global higher education is delivered. As a result, universities are rapidly shifting how they communicate and operate to meet the evolving needs of students and staff. Click here for more details
Stats SA launches online survey to gauge the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic
Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) is appealing to the public to participate in an online survey it launched recently to gauge the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. “Accurate, real-time statistics are of utmost importance in times of crisis,” said Statistician-General Risenga Maluleke. “These surveys will be used to see how COVID-19 has impacted the population, and will be used by government to inform their strategy going forward. For us to win this fight, the decisions we make must be evidenced-based.” COVID-19 and the lock-down will have a multi-dimensional impact. For this reason, the survey will be conducted in three waves. Click here for more details.
SADAG’s Online Survey Findings On COVID-19 And Mental Health
The South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG) has been receiving more calls since the start of lockdown from people feeling anxious, lonely, worried and depressed. Many callers are stressed about a combination of issues including the spread of COVID-19, finances, relationship problems, job security, grief, gender based violence and trauma. Click here for more details
Business impact survey of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa
The COVID-19 pandemic has created profound disruptions to our economy and society. Many South African industries are experiencing an adverse impact from the pandemic, which is consistent with other countries fighting the disease. In its response to the crisis, the South African government has (from 27 March 2020) placed the country under a national lockdown to reduce the spread of the virus, resulting in the closure of many businesses. The businesses affected by the national lockdown are those that are not regarded as providing essential services. These industries include, amongst others, those reliant on the movement of goods (supply chain disruptions), the telecommunications sector, selected mining activities due to a decrease in demand for minerals, accommodation and tourism due to travel bans, construction, transport, and various services. Click here for more details.
Free COVID-19 Social Impact Assessment Survey - Initial Findings
In late March, Relativ in collaboration with one of our tech partners - SocialSuite, who in conjunction with Salesforce, launched a Free COVID-19 Impact Assessment Survey. The survey offers you the opportunity to gather survey data from your own stakeholders allowing you to get a local and global picture of the social impact and response to the crisis. Since launching the free COVID19 Social Impact Assessment a couple of weeks back we've had over 400 organisations participate globally - 80 of those in Southern Africa. Off the back of the participation, we have compiled the attached initial insights that will help you better understand the social impact of COVID-19 and how people are seeking relief. Click here to view the report. Click here for more details.
Domestic perceptions survey understanding covid-19 in SA
South Africa also a causality to the deadly pandemic, led President Cyril Ramaphosa to announce a national state of disaster in terms of the Disaster Management Act and implemented a nationwide lockdown in March 2020. The Government, together with various stakeholders, have used the lockdown period to both refine and intensify several measures to manage COVID-19. Brand South Africa as the custodian of the Nation Brand image and in line with national measures taken to contain the spread of COVID-19 infections, supports Government’s efforts to inform and educate citizens on the virus as well as the precautionary measures implemented. Click here for more details.
Improving Your Crisis Management: How to Future-Proof Your Student Mobility in Times of Crisis
A recent QS survey has revealed that 85% of surveyed higher education institutions have implemented crisis management strategies or plans to deal with the spread of the corona virus. Click here for more details
COVID-19 and CSOs: Shifting the Paradigm for Assistance to the Global South
During this time of global pandemic, we have been increasingly concerned about the fate of local civil society in low- and middle-income countries. We are well-aware of the need to engage local civil society organizations (CSOs) in an effective response to the pandemic, and we are also aware that the pandemic is impeding CSOs from delivering their necessary programs and services to their communities. Click here for more details.
The COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative
The COVID-19 host genetics initiative brings together the human genetics community to generate, share and analyze data to learn the genetic determinants of COVID-19 susceptibility, severity and outcomes. Such discoveries could help to generate hypotheses for drug repurposing, identify individuals at unusually high or low risk, and contribute to global knowledge of the biology of SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease. Click here for more details.
COVID-19 Visualizer
ANDE partner survey
Since 2011, hundreds of accelerators have launched around the world. Investors, development agencies, and governments are excited by their potential to drive growth, spur innovation, and solve social challenges. Despite this interest, rigorous research on the effectiveness of acceleration methods has not kept pace. We currently know little about their effectiveness or how differences across programs and models influence entrepreneur performance. To address this gap, Emory University and ANDE launched the Global Accelerator Learning Initiative (GALI) in collaboration with a consortium of public and private funders. GALI builds on the work of the Entrepreneurship Database Program at Emory University, which works directly with accelerator programs around the world to collect and analyze data from entrepreneurs. Click here for more details.
THE ECONOMY AND THE PANDEMIC WEEK 11 TO 17 MAY 2020
This TIPS tracker highlights important trends in the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, and how they affect the economy. It analyses publically available data, research and media reports to • identify current developments and • reflect on the prognosis for the contagion, the economy, and policy responses. Click here for more details.